Tuesday, February 14, 2012

A Few Shots Against Hypocrisy.




Today we have a guest post courtesy of Anonymous.

Legislators nationwide are voting to protect children against infectious illness by turning down expanded exemptions, blocking new exemptions and adding burdensome requirements to current exemptions. See South Dakota, Washington State, West Virginia, Arizona and Vermont.

There is even a model draft exemption law being passed around to legislators to save them the trouble of writing their own.

We think the legislators are absolutely right to act to protect children against infectious diseases, but they are overlooking a major disease vector: themselves. Legislators work in crowded conditions, especially state legislators. They conduct hearings in small hearing rooms filled with people, in old buildings with inadequate air circulation. They shake hands. They even kiss babies. Looking at all 50 state legislatures, millions of people visit these buildings every year including busloads of school children.

We propose that legislatures end the hypocrisy of mandating lots and lots of vaccines to babies and children while ignoring their own role as germ magnets and get on board with the CDC vaccine schedule for adults. Since the medical profession is okay with giving even premature babies several vaccines at once, there is no reason that an adult legislator couldn’t do the entire recommended schedule (taking into account gender and age) at one doctor visit.

No, we aren’t talking about volunteering for these vaccines. Vaccines for legislators should be mandatory. Whatever exemption laws are currently in place should apply, so if parents need to get a doctor to sign off on an exemption, the legislator should have to get a doctor to sign off on an exemption. The usual rules for medical exemptions will apply. First you get the vaccines. If you react badly, you tell your doctor. If you can convince your doctor that the vaccine caused the reaction (good luck) and if you can convince the doctor that the reaction was serious enough to preclude more vaccinations (good luck), and if you can convince the doctor to actually sign the medical exemption form and (in some states) the health department to sign off on the form, then you can be exempted from the vaccine which caused the reaction. Only, of course, since you got a whole pile of vaccines at one time neither your nor the doctor have any idea which vaccine did it. Tough.

Obviously these mandates should also apply to everyone working in state health departments, from the janitor to the chief. They should be applied to every doctor or pharmacist who testifies in favor of vaccine mandates. Everyone who testifies in favor of forced vaccination should be vaccinated. Obvious, right?

Lobbyists, too, need to get their shots. All that handshaking…

And governors.

And I’m sure that everyone at the Centers for Disease Control is up to date on every possible vaccination.

Get on it folks!


4 comments:

  1. Since most of those legislators have been vaccinated for the most contagious of diseases, and since babies are vaccinated at that young age because several vaccine preventable diseases are most dangerous for newborns and infants, this post of yours seems like nothing but content-free grandstanding. I'm sure your groupies will be impressed, but there's really nothing in it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm so glad you know this for a fact, ChrisKid! There aren't many people that can personally vouch for the entire legislative body! Very impressive. I will absolutely take your word for it. By the way, when was your last set of boosters? And I'm sure you've also had your titers checked to ensure that you are, in fact, fully immunized.....?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Good point. The aim should be that those people get vaccinated until they prove they are immunized. Just to get a shot is sometimes not enough.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Actually vaccination rates among adults are very poor according to this story http://www.reporternews.com/news/2012/feb/12/adults-tend-to-skimp-on-vaccines-more-coverage/

    It is based on the CDC numbers.

    ChrisKid, do you have special info about the vaccination rate of state legislators to share?

    ReplyDelete